Study Evaluates Placebo Effect of CBD on Pain Relief

PainRelief.com Interview with:
Martin De Vita, CPT, MS, USA
Doctoral Candidate
Clinical Psychology Department
Syracuse University

PainRelief.com:  What is the background for this study?  What are the main findings?

Response: Seemingly out of nowhere, cannabidiol (CBD) products became immensely popular. Cross-sectional studies showed widespread use among the public for various clinical conditions. Pain was by far the most commonly reason cited for using CBD. However, no human experimental pain studies had been conducted to evaluate the analgesic effects of CBD. A lot of people questioned whether CBD effects on pain were just a placebo.

To answer this question, we tested people’s baseline pain responding using sophisticated equipment capable of delivering safe, but painful stimulation that activates and evaluates human nervous system processes. Then we administered either CBD or a placebo and re-tested these pain outcomes to see how they changed. We took it a step further and manipulated the information that participants were given about which substance they received. So in some conditions, participants were told they got CBD, even though it was just a placebo. In other conditions, participants were told they got an inactive substance, despite actually receiving CBD. This way, we could test whether simply telling someone that they had received CBD would have an effect on their pain. These are called expectancy effects and there is a large body of literature that supports this phenomenon.

When we looked at the data, we found that CBD analgesia was actually driven by both expectancies (placebo analgesia) and pharmacological action. We also found that these manipulations affected different pain outcomes. We found that both CBD and expectancies reduced pain unpleasantness but not pain intensity. The results were complex in that CBD and expectancies for receiving CBD differentially affected various outcomes. This was exciting because we are left with even more questions to investigate in future research.

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Peptide May Allow Cannabis to Provide Pain Relief Without Unwanted Side Effects

PainRelief.com Interview with:
David Andreu, PhD
Professor of Chemistry
Department of Experimental & Health Sciences
Pompeu Fabra University
Barcelona Biomedical Research Park
Barcelona, Spain

Prof. David Andreu (right)
Maria Gallo,
(first author)
Prof. Rafael Maldonado

PainRelief.com:  What is the background for this study?  What are the main findings?

Response: Background is the (earlier) finding of a cross-talk between CB1 and 5HT2A receptors (two GPCRs forming a heterodimer) that can be acted upon (disrupted) by peptides that allow to dissociate analgesic (CB1-mediated) from (unwanted) cognitive effects ( CB1/5HT2A heterodimer-mediated, memory impairment etc); this is reference 18 of our paper.

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