Knee Osteoarthritis: Orthopedists Prescribing More NSAIDS and Less Lifestyle Management for Pain Relief

PainRelief.com Interview with:

Samannaaz Khoja, PT, PhD
Research Assistant Professor
Department of Physical Therapy
University of Pittsburgh School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Samannaaz Khoja, PT, PhD Research Assistant Professor Department of Physical Therapy University of Pittsburgh School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
Dr. Khoja

PainRelief.com: What is the background for this study? 

ResponseThe purpose of this study was to describe and compare rates of physicians’ recommendation for physical therapy (PT), lifestyle-counseling, and pain medication for knee osteoarthritis (KOA) between 2007 and 2015. The study also aimed to identify patient, physician and practice-level factors associated with each treatment recommendation.   We used survey data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, data from this survey is publicly available and is housed within the CDC. We identified 2297 knee OA related visits, which approximated to 67 (±4) million weighted physician visits between 2007 and 2015 (around 8 million visits/year).

Knee Osteoarthritis: NSAIDS Offer Short-Term Pain Relief

PainRelief.com Interview with:

Raveendhara R. Bannuru MD, PhD, FAGE

Raveendhara R. Bannuru MD, PhD, FAGE
Director, Center for Treatment Comparison and Integrative Analysis (CTCIA)
Deputy Director, Center for Complementary and Integrative Medicine (CCIM)
Asst Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine
Asst Professor of Clinical & Translational Science
Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences
Division of Rheumatology, Tufts Medical Center
Boston, MA

Director, Center for Treatment Comparison and Integrative Analysis (CTCIA)
Deputy Director, Center for Complementary and Integrative Medicine (CCIM)
Asst Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine
Asst Professor of Clinical & Translational Science
Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences
Division of Rheumatology, Tufts Medical Center
Boston, MA

PainRelief.com:  What is the background for this study?  What are the main findings?

Response: Though the higher rates of certain adverse events due to NSAIDs are well documented, we were curious about how soon these adverse events can begin to manifest. We were similarly interested in the efficacy trajectories of NSAIDs, because previous studies had conducted analyses of the last reported follow-up times for the drugs, but we noticed that many of the studies had only very short-term follow up ranging between 1-4 weeks which didn’t provide a more complete picture of the therapeutic effect over time.

The key findings of our study are that the widely used NSAIDs are very effective for short-term pain relief but their efficacy wanes over a period of 12 weeks. The adverse events though mild in nature start appearing within 4 weeks of treatment.

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